Types Of Codeshare Agreement

@Hung Nguyen: Just a word of caution. While QR has a line spacing agreement with VN, most of these agreements only apply if you are traveling with *one* ticket, but not with separate tickets. There may be exceptions, but I don`t expect to check luggage on separate tickets. Code-sharing and line spacing agreements are often confused because of their similarity. Interline agreements can be considered as a passenger service contract for flights between two different airlines. Meanwhile, a codeshare agreement is an alliance between two carriers to expand their networks. Codeshare allows airlines to access more routes without having to serve those destinations themselves. What else do you know about codeshare agreements? Let us let us know in the comments. If a codeshare agreement is like dating, then a joint venture is like getting married.

A joint venture agreement is a massive company decision, which usually requires significant state authorisation. When airlines set up a joint venture, they coordinate prices and schedules and have a revenue-sharing agreement. If you couldn`t see it in my previous article on code sharing, I`m not a fan for the most part. Some of it comes from the traveler experience, and some of it comes from my current work in aviation information technology. I will publish an article in the future about the technical details of code shares, how they work, why it is difficult to manage them, etc. Let`s also focus on the basics. Today there are so many different types of agreements in the aviation sector. ExpertFlyer shows airlines that have interline agreements, so here are the airlines with which American has an interline agreement as an example: this is the most common type of code-sharing and perhaps the most difficult to manage from an airline`s perspective. In the case of codeshare for over-the-counter sale, both airlines enter into an agreement to publish the airline`s flight other than their own, with no or no restrictions on the number of seats it can sell on the flight within capacity limits. . . .